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1965 Quarter Value Guide (Errors & No Mint Mark)

1965 Quarter Value Guide (Errors & No Mint Mark)

You may have found a 1965 quarter as pocket change after you’ve bought coffee or candy. But do you ever think the coin could give you a fortune if you sell it?

The 1965 quarter coins were the first quarters the US made with 0% silver. It was when the nation was undergoing a crisis over the silver coins in circulation.

Only the Philadelphia mint struck the coins, and in large numbers. It must be an error coin if you get a 1965 quarter with a high value.

You’ll have understood every detail about the 1965 quarter value by the end of this post. Let’s start with the price table of the 1965 quarter coins.

1965 Quarter Value by Various Grades

The table below gives you a perfect guide of how much various 1965 quarters cost today. Remember, the costs can change due to multiple economic changes.

1965 Quarter Value Chart

Mint Mark Good Fine Extremely Fine (EF) Uncirculated
1965 No mint Mark Quarter value At least 0.25 USD At least 0.25 USD At least 0.25 USD At least 1 USD

History of the 1965 Quarter

The 1965 quarters have a unique history in the coinage market. They have some interesting facts that attract both owners and coin buyers.

Their release was towards the end of 1964. Most traders in the US were facing the problem of a coin shortage.

In 1963 and 1964, people used the silver Kennedy half-dollars and Roosevelt dimes to trade. But the price of silver saw a sharp rise.

The increase in the price by most coin collectors increased the costs of the two coins series. People chose to hoard them in large numbers to help them make a profit.

Remember, during a silver quarter dollar was worth 93.3 cents in the market. It became tough for the banks to circulate the silver coins because they were less.

So, the government had to design a plan to address the issue. It began by reducing the mintage of Roosevelt and Kennedy half-dollars by 10% in 1963.

But in 1964, the mints reduced production by another 5%. Most people thought that the government’s move would reduce the problem.

Also, by July 23rd, 1964, President Lyndon Johnson signed the bill to make new coins. The coins were to be the 1965 quarters in the form of clad coins.

A clad coin comes from three metal layers. A great artist, John Flanagan, designed the art on the head and tail of the 1965 quarter coins.

Like any other US quarter, the 1965 Washington quarter celebrated the birth of its first president, George Washington. Some collectors will only go for the 1965 quarter coins because of this fact.

It attracted the interest of many collectors during that year. Also, today, most dealers yearn to have this coin because of its unique structure.

Most Americans had now gotten used to coins with silver material. But as for the 1965 quarters, they had no element of silver.

After the government released them in 1965, the public loved the design. So, the traders labeled it the best coin for trade.

Remember, the US government only tasked the Philadelphia mint to strike these coins. The artisans struck around 1,819,717,540 1965 quarter units.

Also, the Denver and San Francisco mints weren’t operating during that period. So, don’t expect to get any 1965 quarter coins with a mint mark.

All the coins went into circulation. Today, they are still common. It means they have a low rarity and a low market price.

 

Features of the 1965 Quarter

It’s safe to know every aspect of a 1965 quarter before selling or buying the coin. It will save you from buying a fake one or selling your quarter at a low price. Below is what to expect on both sides of the 1965 quarter.

The Obverse of the 1965 Quarter

On the head, the 1965 quarter has exciting details. You’ll see President Washington’s portrait facing to the left. It’s the president’s face that gives the coin its name.

The word “Liberty” curves on the top of Washington’s head. Looking at the center below President Washington’s chin, there’s the word “IN GOD WE TRUST.” It has also been the US motto since 1956.

At the bottom, the year mark curves with beauty. Note that you enjoy this look if the coin is in a good grade.

The Reverse of the 1965 Quarter

The Reverse of the 1965 Quarter

Here, the lettering “UNITED STATES OF AMERICA” is curving at the top. Below it, the term “E PLURIBUS UNUM” curves but in a smaller font.

The eagle is present with open arms while clutching onto a board. It speaks a lot about freedom in the US.

You’ll see some olive twigs below it. Also, the “quarter dollar” term sits at the bottom. Such beauty speaks a key message and increases the coin’s value.

Other Features of the 1965 Quarter

On a weighing scale, the coins weigh 5.67 grams. Looking at their diameter, they are 24.30 millimeters wide.

The coin has beautiful reeded edges when in the proper conditions. Expect the coin to be shiny and brown.

As for the 1965 quarter metal composition, the clad has 75% copper and 25% nickel. Such coins have a melt value of 4 cents because they are easy to get today. Remember, the nickel is over a pure copper center.

 

1965 Quarter Value Guides

Understanding the value of your 1965 quarter is essential. You’ll buy or sell the coin at its best market price. So, here are more details about the different prices of 1965 quarter coins.

Since the Philadelphia mint struck these coins in high numbers, expect them to have low prices. Most grades’ prices are equal to their face value, 0.25 USD.

If it falls into the uncirculated grade of mint state (MS) 60 and above, it will sell for at least 60 USD.

Such 1965 quarters aren’t easy to get today. Thus, it is gold to most collectors.

How to Grade the 1965 Quarter

How to Grade the 1965 Quarter

Learning how to group your 1965 quarter coin helps you know its price. Also, it gives you the urge to handle the coin well once you know its grade. Now, here are the various classes of the 1965 quarters.

Uncirculated (MS 60)

Today, it’s rare to get a 1965 quarter in this class. Such coins never passed through the hands of trade.

If there are any present marks, you won’t see them with your naked eyes. Every detail of the hair is present, and the hairline is separate from Washington’s head.

The eagle’s beauty is also visible. Remember, the coin has some great and shiny luster. You’ll sell the quarter for at least 1 USD.

Extra Fine (EF 40)

All 1965 quarters in this class have less wear, even if they went through the hands of trade. Every detail remains intact and in great shape.

The weary are present on both sides but in low numbers. You’ll see it on the high points of Washington’s hair and the eagle’s breasts and legs.

Also, the luster may still be present. Despite the excellent qualities, the coin will sell at 0.25 USD.

Fine (F 12)

The coins here went through many hands but had moderate wear. You’ll see that the letters are bold and clear.

Expect some wear on the hair at the back of Washington’s head. All the fine details on the eagle’s feathers aren’t present due to a lot of wear.

You’d be lucky to sell the coin as a collectible today. Remember, the rim is still complete. It’s also separate from the letters.

Good (G 4)

A 1965 quarter in this state has heavy wear. The lettering and President Washington’s face are flat because of many marks.

Such quarters have gone through many hands of trade and poor keeping. Its key features are present but like an outline.

Today, you can’t sell the coins as a collectible. Such quarters have the same price as their face value.

 

1965 Quarter Errors

Like any other error coin, a 1965 quarter coin with mint mistakes can earn you a massive fortune. You’ll enjoy the profits if the quarter lies in an excellent grade. Below are the most common 1965 quarter coin errors in today’s market.

The 1965 Quarter Double Tail Error

Today, the PCGS has a record of only three copies of the 1965 quarters with such errors. They have a unique error that can give you a massive fortune.

The artisans in the mint struck these coins with the details of the reverse appearing on both sides. Remember, only numismatists could judge the quarter as a 1965 quarter.

It’s because the reverse doesn’t have the year mark. As a collector, beware of the fake errors on coins of this type.

Some cons cut the Washington quarter coins in half and glue the two tails together. Such events happen because the value of this error coin is high. Two of the three copies sold at 80,000 USD and 41,000 USD.

The 1965 Quarter Broad Strike Minting Error

There are also some 1965 quarter coins with a broad open strike on the planchet. It happened when the ring that held the coin didn’t fit well.

Now the coins, like the artisans, stretched it to the edges. In these 1965 quarter error coins, expect the lettering to look longer and flatter.

Also, a close mistake, a struck-through, is present on some 1965 quarter coins. During the mintage, it may be that an impure element, like a clip, may have gotten in between the dies.

It then left an imperfect look on the coins. Most dealers would pay many dollars to own this error coin.

The 1965 Quarter Double Die on the Obverse

The 1965 Quarter Double Die on the Obverse

Double die errors on the obverse are common and couldn’t miss in the 1965 quarters. The artisans struck the die on the same planchet several times on this error coin.

So, it makes some of the parts appear doubled. The artisans repeat the strike if the first strike makes the art appear faint on the coin.

You’ll see the mistakes in the letters “IN GOD WE TRUST,” “LIBERTY,” and the 1965-year mark. Also, the doubling is on President Washington’s eyes and falling hair.

If your 1965 quarter has a lot of wear, it will be hard to see the errors. The coins can cost you at least 300 USD, depending on their current condition.

PCGS terms the errors coins to be rare today. Expect most collectors to be on the hunt for these coins.

The 1965 Quarter Double Die on the Reverse

The 1965 Quarter Double Die on the Reverse

Some 1965 Washington quarters have a doubling on the reverse. Still, the artisans in the mints made the same mistake as on the double die obverse.

The doubling is present on the words “UNITED STATES OF AMERICA,” “E. PLURIBUS UNUM,” and the quarter dollar label. Some of these error coins have doubled on the eagle’s wings.

You’ll need a magnifying glass to see these mintage mistakes. Remember, such errors aren’t easy to get in most 1965 quarters.

So, the coins have a high value under various grades. The quarter can earn you at least 200 USD but varies with its present state.

The 1965 Quarter-Off Center Strike

The 1965 Quarter-Off Center Strike

With this 1965 quarter error coin, the artisans struck the coin’s design details sideways. It appears like the planchet wasn’t at the center during the mintage.

Some parts of the coins are missing both on the head and tail. It can be the lettering, year mark, or part of President Washington’s face. Such 1965 quarters aren’t easy to get in today’s market.

So, collectors will yearn to add the error coin to their list of collectibles. If you own any of these coins on a high grading scale, it will earn you at least 100 USD.

The 1965 Quarter Wrong Planchet Strike

Getting a coin with this mistake isn’t easy. But you can find several versions of this error on various 1965 quarter error coins.

Here, the artists struck the coin’s details on another unexpected or wrong planchet. Such coins were never to circulate. Still, they came out to the hands of some coin dealers.

You’ll find one that the mint struck on a 10-cent planchet. Another one has a penny planchet.

Such 1965 quarter error coins have an odd look. It’s easy to notice this error when you see it.

The artisans made a mistake because the die face covers a larger area than the material on the dime plate. So, most details of the 1965 quarter are missing.

A blank dime went into the machine by mistake during the mintage. It then led to this unique error.

Today, it’s not easy to get these error coins. So, expect the ones with a dime plate error to have an average cost of 4,500 USD.

As for the one with a penny planchet, it can cost around 1000 USD. The prices vary with their grade.

The 1965 Silver Quarter Transitional Error

Some 1965 error coins also have transitional mistakes. As the US government changed from 90% to 0% silver, some silver coin blanks came into the hopper.

Though these silver quarters were few, they circulated for some time. After that, some collectors noticed the error.

The error coin looks similar to the legit 1965 quarter. But it doesn’t have the copper-colored reeded edge.

Also, the 1965 silver quarter coins weigh 6.25 grams. It’s different from the regular 1965 quart that weighs 5.67 grams.

Such coins aren’t easy to get in today’s coinage market. It is the joy of most coin collectors to add this coin to their list.

You’ll earn at least 4500 USD from the sale if you own it. Remember, the price will vary with the coin’s present condition.

 

FAQs

Here are the top questions that most coin dealers ask around. They’ll help you to learn more about these Washington coins.

How can you tell if a 1965 quarter is a silver coin?

Any 1965 silver quarter is a transitional error coin. If you have a weighing scale, expect the coin to be 6.25 grams.

The coin’s color on the edges is silver. You can also use a magnet to confirm that it’s a silver coin.

Are 1965 quarters supposed to have a mint mark?

No, the coins can’t have a mint mark. It’s because only Philadelphia made the coins, and their coins never had any mint marks.

Are all 1965 quarters valuable?

Not every 1965 quarter has a great fortune. The mint struck these coins in high numbers, so they sell best in the uncirculated grade. Also, the 1965 quarter errors can earn you a lot of profit.

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Tuesday 8th of November 2022

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