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1943 Copper Penny Value Guides (Errors, “D”, “S”, and No Mint Mark)

1943 Copper Penny Value Guides (Errors, “D”, “S”, and No Mint Mark)

The 1943 copper pennies are one of the rarest and most expensive coins. But what would you do if you came across this penny in your coin box or pocket change? What will you sell it for today?

Finding a 1943 copper penny is like mining gold. Whether the mint struck these coins by accident or not, they have great value today.

Also, it is easy to get fake versions of these coins. Coin dealers love the 1943 copper penny because of its rarity and fascinating history.

So, this post will explain to you every detail about the 1943 copper penny value. It is time for you to make a fortune from your 1943 copper penny.

1943 Copper Penny Value with Various Guides

Knowing the exact range of your 1943 copper penny’s value is crucial. It helps you understand how you’ll bargain or sell your 1943 penny at the best price.

Please take a close look at this guide to help you. Remember, these prices can change because of the ever-changing economic times.

1943 Copper Penny Value Chart

Mint Mark Good Fine Extremely Fine Uncirculated
1943 Copper Penny with No mint Mark At least 100,000 USD At least 150,000 USD Around 200,000 USD At least 250,000 USD
1943 “S” Copper Penny At least 100,000 USD At least 150,000 USD Around 200,000 USD At least 250,000 USD
1943 “D” Copper Penny At least 100,000 USD At least 150,000 USD Around 200,000 USD At least 250,000 USD

History of the 1943 Copper Penny

Besides having a high price, 1943 copper pennies have a sweet and exciting history. Some people deem the pennies as Mint error coins, but they may be wrong.

The US Mint struck these coins during World War II. It was the government’s choice to make coins using zinc-coated steel.

So, they expected to save more copper and tin by making armor for the troops. Remember, their armies were fighting in Europe and Japan.

After the President made it a law, the three mints struck many 1943 steel Lincoln wheat pennies. But during the mintage, some copper planchets were struck by artisans with the 1943 details.

Striking these wasn’t a mistake because the makers left the copper planchets in the hoopers while making the steel ones. Since the mints released the few units of the 1943 copper pennies, they became rare.

Collectors and the public got interested in why the coin is rare. So, it made the 1943 copper penny have a massive value in the coinage market.

In the late 1940s, Henry Ford, owner of the Ford Company, was also on a high hunt for these coins. Henry was offering anyone who came across the penny a new Ford car.

It wasn’t easy to trace the coin even as it was circulating. But in 1944, dealers first found a 14-year-old boy with such a penny.

The coin was in an extra fine (EF 45) grade. Later on, collectors sold the same coin for around 40,000 USD.

At least 40 pieces of the 1943 copper penny came from the three mints. The mints were Philadelphia, Denver, and San Francisco.

Today, the PCGS confirms a record of 27 1943 copper pennies. PCG has recorded 13 pieces.

Out of the 40 units, 20 are from the Philadelphia mint. The rest of the pieces come from the Denver and San Francisco mint.

It’s not easy to get any person with such a precious coin. They are one of the most valuable pennies that still exist.

So, it shows why the coin can sell for millions when in any condition. But if you are a buyer, know that there are many fake units of the 1943 copper penny.

 

Features of the 1943 Copper Penny

Getting to know the aspects of a 1943 copper penny is vital. So, be keen on every trait of the 1943 copper penny. You’ll learn the coin’s correct price and avoid buying a fake 1943 copper penny.

The Obverse of the 1943 Copper Penny

The Obverse of the 1943 Copper Penny

Image: coinagemag

You’ll see the bust of President Abraham Lincoln on the coin’s front. Here, Lincoln faces to the right while wearing a suit and a bow tie.

The words “IN GOD WE TRUST” curve at the top of Lincoln’s head. Such terms are a source of unity for US citizens.

At the center left of the obverse is the term “LIBERTY.” Still, the word says much about US culture and unity.

On the bottom left, above Lincoln’s chest, is the 1943-year mark. Expect to enjoy these aspects if the coin has a few wear marks.

The Reverse of the 1943 Copper Penny

The Reverse of the 1943 Copper Penny

There are more fantastic, deep-meaning features at the back. The term “E. PLURIBUS. UNUM” curves at the top. It was the US motto during that year.

Below the motto, there is the term “ONE CENT.” It has the largest font of all the words. Also, the engraver placed the words “UNITED STATES OF AMERICA” at the bottom center.

Expect to see the wheat sheaths curving to the sides. Note that the sheaths give it the name “1943 copper wheat penny.”

Other Feathers of the 1943 Copper Penny

Every 1943 copper penny weighs 3.11 grams. But the weight can reduce because of circulation. The actual identification of 1943 copper pennies is in these aspects.

Also, a 1943 copper penny has a diameter of 19 millimeters (mm), or 0.75 inches. Expect it to be 1.55 mm thick, or 0.061 inches thick.

Besides the size, the coin has a metal composition of 95% copper and 5% zinc. Such coins don’t rust fast.

All 1943 copper pennies have a smooth edge. The mark is below the year for the ones with a mint mark “S” for the San Francisco mint and “D” for the Denver mint. It’s between numbers 9 and 4.

 

1943 Copper Penny Value Guides

All 1943 copper pennies from the three mints have almost the same market price. What will vary is the present condition that places them in their various grades.

1943 No Mint Mark Copper Penny

Grading companies rate the 1943 copper from Philadelphia mint at 100,000 USD in the good grade (G 4). The coin will sell for at least 250,000 USD in its best status.

For example, in 2014, at a public sale, the coin sold for around 329,000 USD. It has a grade of AU 55.

1943 “S” Copper Penny

1943 “S” Copper Penny

CGS lists that the best 1943 “S” copper penny goes for 1,000,000 USD. Such a piece is in the uncirculated grade and of high rarity.

When in the lowest grade, G 4, the coin can sell for at least 100,000 USD. It is because of their high rarity level. You’d be lucky enough to own a 1943 copper penny with a G-4 grade.

1943 “D” Copper Penny

1943 “D” Copper Penny

All the 1943 copper pennies from the Denver mint will sell for many dollars. At a G-4 rating, it can sell for at least 100,000 USD. You’ll earn around 150,000 USD if the coin is in a fine state.

PCGS rates them as having the best price of 1.5 million dollars in their highest mint state. But the price could be higher if a bidder with a better price comes along for the coin.

 

How to Grade the 1943 Copper Penny

How to Grade the 1943 Copper Penny

Understanding your 1943 copper penny’s grade lets you know its best value. If you are selling or buying the coin, no one will lie to you about the coin’s quality.

Uncirculated

Any 1943 copper penny in this grade is worth every dollar. Today, getting such a coin with such deep quality is hard.

Here, the grade will start from about uncirculated (AU) of 50 to the mint state (MS) of 67. On the lower side, you’ll see a few marks. You won’t see any wear on the higher grades.

Such 1943 copper pennies never went through many hands. For those that have a few marks, the owners never kept them well. Sometimes, it can be that dealers have sold it several times.

Otherwise, such coins have a deep luster. You’ll enjoy this aspect if you view the penny under the sun.

If the coin gets the highest grade of MS 67, you know you own a precious item. It will have zero flaws, both in the head and tail. So, expect to earn a fortune from its sale.

Extra Fine

In this class, the 1943 copper penny will have a few marks on a scale of EF 40 or XF 40. Otherwise, every detail on this 1943 copper penny is sharp.

It is because of going through fewer hands. Also, the owners kept the coin well.

You’ll see the deep and critical details on Lincoln’s face, ear, and bow tie. The high points of the wheat sheaths look fabulous on such a 1943 copper penny.

Remember, every 1943 copper penny in this grade must appeal to your eye. Any trace of wear marks will reduce the coin’s beauty by a vast margin. Sometimes, you’ll be lucky to see that the penny still has its mint luster.

Fine

The 1943 copper pennies in this class went through many hands of trade. But they have moderate wear. With a rating of F 12, the penny will still sell at a great price.

Your 1943 copper penny will have moderate wear. Expect the year and letters to be clear and easy to read.

Lincoln’s cheeks and jawbone are smooth but not flat. Some lines of the wheat sheaths have wear marks but are separate. Collectors wouldn’t mind adding a 1943 steel penny to their list.

Good

If your 1943 copper penny is in this grade, it will still sell despite its looks. It is because of their high rarity level.

A 1943 copper penny in this class will have heavy wear. Every letter, legend, and year mark are present but with some faintness.

President Lincoln’s face is worn out and flat. Also, the wheat sheaths at the tail appear faint because some details are missing. On the grading scale, it will have a rate of G 4.

 

1943 Copper Penny Errors

Getting a 1943 copper penny with an error is a great discovery. It’s not easy for someone to own such a coin. But here are details of a 1943 copper penny with a mint mistake and its worth.

1943 Copper Penny with a Die Break (Obverse)

In 2017, the NGC reported a unique piece of the 1943 copper Lincoln cent. It had a visible die break at the bottom. Collectors call it a cud of the obverse.

Such an error happened while the artisans in the Philadelphia mint were striking the coin. In the process, the planchet metal got into the cavity. It then created a blob.

The cud cuts out some parts of President Lincoln’s coat. According to NGC, the coin has an MS 62 grade. Also, the error coin costs 575,000 USD.

Albert Michael Pratt possessed this coin, and his son, Michael Pratt, inherited the gems. Albert Pratt worked at the Philadelphia Mint during the mintage of the 1943 copper pennies.

 

FAQs

Here are the top queries that most coin dealers ask about the 1943 copper pennies. You’ll have a vast knowledge of the value of these coins.

How will you know that your 1943 copper penny is a fake one?

A 1943 copper penny has a brown look. Also, you can use a magnet to confirm that it’s a copper metal because it won’t attract.

Also, it would be best if you were alert of the number 3 of the year. Use a magnifying glass to see if the artisans rubbed the edges of number 3. If so, the coin is a dupe that a person filed down from the 1948 version.

What should you do if you think you have a legit 1943 copper penny?

Once you have confirmed that your 1943 copper penny is legit, don’t let anyone grade it. Instead, choose pros from PGSC or NGC.

Otherwise, some dealers will replace it with a fake one or give it a low grade. In the end, you’ll be on the losing side.

Is the 1943 copper penny an error coin?

All 1943 copper coins aren’t Mint error coins. Most dealers call it the “error coin” because the artisans minted it when it wasn’t in its mintage period.

The US government didn’t allow mints to make the Lincoln pennies using copper planchets. Either way, an error coin or not, selling a 1943 copper penny will earn you a great fortune.

Thomas Kelley

Monday 28th of November 2022

I have a legitimate 1943 s copper wheat cent how do I go about getting it graded at the cheapest price I really low on funds I've got other ones but this is the bacon on my buscit